Preparing for COT

Considering this took oh so much time and energy over the past several months, I decided to share what went into preparing for commissioned officer training (COT) at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, Alabama. Hopefully this will help any future commissioned Air Force officers. I will be heading there tomorrow and still need to finish printing paperwork and packing!

1) Pass the medical exam.
This can involve medical waivers, blood tests, x-rays, and the works if you do not pass the first time. For me, it meant I needed to lose 15 pounds during the government shutdown so that I qualified.

2) Fill out the paperwork.
There is paperwork galore. Medical paperwork. Contract paperwork. Oath paperwork. Coordinating details after receiving orders. There is a hodgepodge of information everywhere, and you just cross your fingers that you filled everything out appropriately and sent the forms to the correct people. Luckily, I have only encountered military personnel who are beyond understanding that this is a confusing process.

3) Look the part.
This probably applies for females more than males. I like a lot of color in my life. I love painting my nails and wearing happy accessories (my favorite color is sun yellow). I have experimented with dying my hair from blonde to black, as well as the ROYGBIV spectrum of hair streaks. I never do anything to my hair when it comes to styling because it dries perfectly. I struggle more with buns and ponytails than leaving it alone. So that is my disclaimer for including this section. If you are female, I strongly encourage youtube videos and pinterest to know how to do military hair (especially the sock bun). As long as guys cut their hair appropriately, they’re set. I chose not to cut my hair under shoulder-length. If your hair is thick and layered like myself, it can be a struggle. I am still not completed prepared for COT when it comes to looking the part.

4) Anticipate the sports physical.
We have different requirements based on sex and age, but there is a 1.5-mile run, 1 minute push-ups, and 1 minute sit-ups. I have worked on all three and am hopefully going to pass at 90% (passing is 75%, but 90%+ is preferred). Honestly though, I find all three to be a struggle when I am aiming for a certain number. I will likely talk about this process in detail in another post when I do my sports physical at officer training.

5) Read up.
Know what you’re getting yourself into, and know what will be expected. There are dozens of blogs, the USUHS website, the COT website, documents detailing rules and regulation, and books galore. Previous students, especially my student sponsor, have been excellent resources. I’m also currently reading the Air Force Officer’s Guide, which provides a nice overview. I learned that we will be doing a ropes course at COT, and I am actually quite afraid of heights. I am perfectly fine on planes and on roller coasters, but being high in the air without solid ground isn’t my forte (ironic that I chose Air Force, I know). I like challenging myself though, and I went to Earth Treks with an NIH coworker in Rockville and climbed three intense rock walls to conquer my fears. I cannot say I enjoyed the experience, but I believe I can work through my fear of heights if I have to. Now I will not be taken off guard when we need to do our ropes course this summer.

6) Pack everything you need.
I read every packing list available to know exactly what I’ll need to bring (will likely post a final list after my own experience for future officer trainees!). The number of snacks I’m bringing is probably unnecessary, but I am a grazer and I don’t mind sharing.

I definitely feel out of my element. I am excited for medical school but terribly anxious for officer training. I heard it’s mostly “death by powerpoint”, so we’ll see if it holds up to its reputation. I will have lots to learn: saluting, marching, saying “m’am” and “sir”. I definitely accomplished what I hoped to accomplish before this time with my NIH paper, travel, and catching up with friends and family. Now it’s on to the next big chapter. Second Lieutenant Anvari, out!

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